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Four North Cornwall Dog Friendly Beach Walks

Cornwall is more dog-friendly than ever now the rules on dogs on beaches are changing for 2020, but there will still be restrictions. Thankfully we have four super suggestions of walks that are dog-friendly all year, courtesy of Latitude50.

With Easter on the horizon, and the evenings are drawing out (is it me or does it feel like it has been dark for months) spring is just around the corner.

As yours truly is not blessed with a doggy pal, I asked Katy Austin-Waters, Sales and Marketing Manager at North Cornwall experts Latitude50 for her suggestions for some north Cornwall walks for your four-legged friends that you can enjoy year-round. (Here’s our update on the dog-ban on Cornwall’s beaches)

Lundy Bay near Polzeath

A short circular walk off the beaten track through an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty on a National Trust footpath. It leads you through a sheltered valley with grassy meadows and scrub to a small rocky bay with golden sand.

Location: 5 minutes’ drive from New Polzeath and 10 minutes from Polzeath (grid reference SX953795).

Distance: 1 mile.

Time: 30 to 40 minutes (or a little longer for time to take in the scenery).

Difficulty: Easy (sloping paths, some stony terrain and steps down to access Lundy Bay).

For you: Take in a lot of beautiful coastal scenery in a short space of time while exercising your dog.

For your dog: Plenty of grass to run on, scrub to explore and – for those so inclined – a splash in the stream or sea on the right tide.

Highlights: Two viewing spots on the way down, one of a small and secluded sandy cove far below the path and the other of a collapsed sea cave. The small golden sandy beach of Lundy Bay on a lower tide at the bottom of the path.

Lead? Well behaved dogs could stay off the lead for the whole walk but there are a couple of points where the path is close to the cliff edge, so dogs that run off might need to be put on a lead here.

Parking: National Trust car park with a donation box suggesting £2 per car.

Stay nearby – Troy 

The Rumps

A mid-length circular walk starting at the Lead Mines National Trust car park taking you onto one of the most scenic stretches of the South West Coast Path past the iconic landmark The Rumps. Enjoy picturesque farmland, rugged coastline and one of the best locations for year-round sea-watching on Cornwall’s Atlantic north coast.

Location: 5 minutes’ drive from Polzeath and 10 minutes from Rock (grid reference SW942799, nearest postcode PL27 6QY).

Distance: 2 miles.

Time: 1.5 to 2 hours (including time to take in the scenery).

Difficulty: Moderate (path is steep in places, some stony terrain and one set of steps built into the hillside).

For you: Tick off one of the most beautiful local landmarks whilst getting the chance to spot seals, dolphins and harbour porpoises.

For your dog: Plenty of green space for running and chasing balls as well as scrub land to explore.

Highlights: The Rumps which is a twin-headed promontory formed from hard basaltic rock and the island off The Rumps called The Mouls (also referred to as Puffin Island as it is one of the last remaining breeding places for Atlantic puffins on the coast).

Lead? Some areas of the coast path run close to the cliff edge, so dogs might need to be put on a lead for these sections. If there is livestock on the land, dogs are required to be under close control or on a lead.

Parking: National Trust car park with a donation box suggesting £2 per car.

Pack: Your binoculars for wildlife spotting, walking shoes or trainers in the summer and some refreshments to enjoy on the way round.

Stay nearby – Pinetree Lodge 

The St Enodoc loop

A short circular walk starting at the Daymer Bay car park taking you across the famous St Enodoc Golf Course, past the picture-perfect St Enodoc Church, around the scenic coast path that hugs the side of Brea Hill and down onto the golden sand of Daymer Bay beach.

Location: Daymer Bay, a 5 minute drive from Polzeath and 10 minutes from Rock (grid reference SW928776, nearest postcode PL27 6SA).

Distance: 1.5 miles.

Time: 1 hour (including time to take in the scenery).

Difficulty: Easy to moderate (some of the paths are stony).

For you: Tick off one of the area’s most beautiful local landmarks; St Enodoc Church, discover the picturesque St Enodoc Golf Course, take in views of the Camel Estuary from the South West Coast Path and enjoy Daymer Bay beach.

For your dog: Sand dunes to explore, the beach to run on and the sea to splash in.

Highlights: St Enodoc Church, one of the most picture-perfect churches in Cornwall and the resting place of Poet Laureate Sir John Betjeman. From the church, you can enjoy beautiful views across the golf course and out to sea.

Lead? If there are golfers on the golf course you may want to put your dog on a lead if they are likely to chase balls! There are a couple of areas along the coast path that run close to the cliff edge, so dogs might need to be put on a lead for these sections.

Parking: Private car park. Winter tariffs start from £1 for one hour and summer tariffs start from £3.50 for up to three hours.

Pack: Your camera to capture the sights and change for the car park. Walking boots aren’t necessary.

Stay nearby – Skylarks 

The Pentire loop

A medium length, circular walk starting at the Pentire Farm car park and taking you across beautiful National Trust farmland and onto the South West Coast Path. Enjoy breathtaking views from Pentire Point out to sea and towards Polzeath and discover the little beach of Pentire Haven.

Location: Pentire Farm near New Polzeath, a five-minute drive from Polzeath and ten-minutes from Rock (grid reference SW936802, nearest postcode PL27 6UQ).

Distance: 2.1 miles.

Time: 1.5 to 2 hours (including time to take in the scenery).

Difficulty: moderate (some of the paths are steep and stony).

For you: tick off one of the area’s most beautiful local landmarks; Pentire Point and take in the breathtaking panoramic views from the top taking in including Stepper Point, the Camel Estuary and across to Polzeath. Time it right in the evening and there are some fantastic places to stop and take in the famous Polzeath sunset.

For your dog: lush green fields to run in (providing they are free of livestock) and inland sections of footpaths to safely explore.

Lead? if there is livestock on the land, dogs are required to be under close control or on a lead. Please close all gates behind you. Dogs will also need to be kept on the lead for the section of coast path that runs close to the cliff.

Parking: small National Trust car park with a donation box.

Pack: your binoculars for wildlife spotting, wellies in the winter months as the footpath can get muddy (walking shoes or trainers in the summer), warm clothes if you are doing the walk in the evening and some refreshments to enjoy on the way round.

Stay nearby – Endymion 

WANT MORE, MORE, MORE?

For full photo guides of each walk and other doggie inspiration, head over to the Latitude50 Journal.

Latitude50 have over sixty dog-friendly properties to choose from in and around Polzeath, Daymer Bay, Rock and Port Isaac. 

Latitude50.com

Find more ideas here

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